May 16, 2015

Homeless Hospice Center to Open Doors in Poplar Grove, Director Responds to Community Concerns

Executive Director Kim Correa speaks at the May 11 ribbon cutting for the INN Between, a homeless hospice house. Several religious leaders of different faiths spoke and offered prayers and blessings for the new center. State Representative Sandra Hollins and State Senator Jim Dabakis both gave speeches and together cut the ribbon. Over 200 people were in attendance. The 20-bed hospice house will provide fresh clothing, bedding, meals, activities, and emotional and spiritual support to homeless individuals in their final days, weeks or months. The INN Between is accepting financial and item donations. The 20-bed hospice house will provide fresh clothing, bedding, meals, activities, and emotional and spiritual support to homeless individuals in their final days, weeks or months. The INN Between is accepting financial and item donations.
Executive Director Kim Correa speaks at the May 11 ribbon cutting for the INN Between, a homeless hospice house. Several religious leaders of different faiths spoke and offered prayers and blessings for the new center. State Representative Sandra Hollins and State Senator Jim Dabakis both gave speeches and together cut the ribbon. Over 200 people were in attendance.|The 20-bed hospice house will provide fresh clothing, bedding, meals, activities, and emotional and spiritual support to homeless individuals in their final days, weeks or months. The INN Between is accepting financial and item donations.|The 20-bed hospice house will provide fresh clothing, bedding, meals, activities, and emotional and spiritual support to homeless individuals in their final days, weeks or months. The INN Between is accepting financial and item donations.|| Executive Director Kim Correa speaks at the May 11 ribbon cutting for the INN Between, a homeless hospice house. Several religious leaders of different faiths spoke and offered prayers and blessings for the new center. State Representative Sandra Hollins and State Senator Jim Dabakis both gave speeches and together cut the ribbon. Over 200 people were in attendance.|The 20-bed hospice house will provide fresh clothing, bedding, meals, activities, and emotional and spiritual support to homeless individuals in their final days, weeks or months. The INN Between is accepting financial and item donations.|The 20-bed hospice house will provide fresh clothing, bedding, meals, activities, and emotional and spiritual support to homeless individuals in their final days, weeks or months. The INN Between is accepting financial and item donations.|| ||||
By The West View

The Inn Between, a hospice and respite center for the homeless, will be the first institution of its kind in Utah, offering, according to its web site, "a safe, comfortable place where the homeless can spend [their] final days."

Homeless advocates and clergy who support the facility, call it a "sanctuary that will allow the homeless to die with dignity."

However, The Inn Between, located at 344 S. Goshen Street, in the building that formerly housed Guadalupe School, has drawn concerns from nearby neighbors.
At a community council meeting on April 22, some Poplar Grove residents worried that the hospice center would threaten the safety of their neighborhood and lower their property values, and were upset that they had not been consulted. "The process has not been good; all of the neighbors should have been informed early on," said Sandra Renak.

"We love the idea of your business, just not the location," said one concerned neighbor who lives on Bothwell St.

Kim Correa, executive director of the Inn Between, responded by saying, "Our board has the exact same concerns....We want to be a good neighbor, so that we won't have to move...We don't want what's happening at Rio Grande or the Road Home."

Asked if people will be allowed to come and go, Correa replied, "I don't expect it to be a revolving door." She said that although they will offer short-term respite care for some individuals, their primary concern is end-of-life care for terminally ill patients who have been referred by the Fourth Street Clinic and The Road Home.
Francisco Hernandez, a single father of two, said he was worried sick about the safety of his children, who are sometimes home alone at their house on Goshen Street. He and other neighbors fear that the homeless hospice center will attract a criminal element.

Correa told him that a resident manager will monitor entrances and exits through security cameras, and that they will work toward hiring a security guard in the future, if need be.

At the ribbon-cutting ceremony on May 11, Correa said that residents' concerns were allayed by an open house that took place on May 6. She said that initially some residents didn't understand that most of the work would stay within the facility walls, and worried that it would spill out onto the sidewalks.

The twenty-bed facility will offer dormitories and common rooms for its residents, and a memorial garden to remember those who've died there. Attractive landscaping and a community garden are also planned at the site, which is scheduled to accept its first residents on June 1.