The West View

The West View

SHE’S A GRAND NEW FLAG!

Last Memorial Day, Rose Park residents Angela Morgan and Kent Mayberry gathered support on social media to replace a small, tattered flag on the community flagpole at 1000 N. 900 West in the Park ‘n Ride lot. They pushed for the Rose Park Community Council to regain guardianship of the flag from the city, because it wasn’t being maintained well.

On July 3, 2021, just in time for the Fourth of July holiday, community members gathered for a rededication of the flagpole, and the installment of a new, large flag paid for with donations from community members.

The flagpole contains a plaque honoring the late VerDon Rodger Parker, who served as RPCC chair at the time the flagpole was originally installed over 30 years ago. Corky Reeser with RPCC said that the city pledged to install a new light to illuminate the flag at night.

Published in Fall 2021

What qualifies you to represent your district?

I am a doer. As a new American, I understand equity. I crafted municipal policy as a former employee of the SL County Council. I found resources to fund training and officers as a former civilian employee of the Unified Police. I am well-rounded and solve issues. I match our district's needs.

Identify two key issues that you are concerned about. As a city council member, what specific actions will you take to address those issues? Homelessness & Affordable Housing

Homelessness / Affordable Housing: Right now, the city's passivity is pitting neighbors against the homeless and each other. We are stalling and not doing anything meaningful. We push the homeless from one corner of the Westside to the other. That is not leadership. Short term: We need small legal camping zones created all over the city (other cities create partnerships with churches to host them). Protected camping would provide some sort of order so we can help unsheltered people while making sure our citizens can enjoy their own neighborhoods. Long-term: allocate a sufficient amount of the coming one-time federal money to tackle homelessness. I know there are many priorities to which this money can be allocated, but this is the most serious crisis we have, and we need to demonstrate it is by investing strategically and heavily. 

Crime & Safety: Even in safer areas of District 2 people are wary of the stress we are under. Public safety must be a priority for our kids, our seniors, and all our families. We have too many family calls for high-priority calls that take far too long to answer. It is a serious matter. The Westside has a harsh reputation, and the city exacerbates our stress by not putting the resources we need to address the issues we face.  The other side of public safety we need to address, are the issues with our roads, streetlights (or lack thereof), and crosswalks (or lack thereof). We've seen a disproportionate number of kids run over. We see unaddressed speeding in residential neighborhoods. Our sidewalks are impassible in areas. As a council member, I will be on top of this because this is what affects our quality of life.

What is your background, and what motivated you to run?

As an immigrant, I recognize the debt I owe to this country. I am eager to engage in public service that enhances all the wonderful things that made me want to become a citizen here, while helping fix those things that will make us even better. I decided to run because I asked the city to provide a stop sign and traffic light near my house, which is located alongside an elementary school. I've repeatedly heard refusals and excuses. I know the city can do better and my neighbors deserve more. So, I am standing up for us all.

Identify an example where you had to make a choice between doing what was right and what was popular/politically expedient.

When I was a student at BYU, I served as the international student president. There was a moment when we had to re-charter the club that gave a voice to students from all backgrounds and nationalities. We noticed that the standard anti-discrimination clause didn't include sexual orientation or identity. We all felt we needed to include it. My partners in the project understood the need to stand up for those, like me, that didn't fit in the boxes that were listed. Our group became a conduit between students and the university, helping them to understand the different needs on campus. Because we understood this unmet need in our student body, even though it was a risk to bring it up with the administration, it was the right thing to do. We were able to build consensus and understanding that protected students and demonstrated responsiveness to our university’s standards. Years later, BYU added those words as standard for all anti-discrimination clauses for all clubs – a sign that our work AND the approach we took were valuable and valued. 

If you are elected, how will you engage with your constituents to know their needs/concerns?

I am intimately connected to my community. I speak the same language, literally, as the largest constituency in my district. My dog, Petunia is a well-known feature for the local school children and their families. I show up at the Sunday Market at Jordan Park in the summer and support local nonprofit events during the winter. My communication plan is rooted in my general connection to the community.

Outside of this natural strength, I bring to the table, I also run a consulting firm that manages communication forums. I am well versed in the newest and most effective communication strategies and will be using them to stay connected to my neighbors. I know that communication in my area needs to meet many needs. My neighbors work hard, often at several jobs. Their plates are full keeping up with the changing city and their families' needs. By using my well-earned skill in creating diverse communication strategies, I will be sure to engage as many people as possible. As a sign of good faith that I will follow through on this, everyone I meet during my campaign has received my personal cell phone number and I will always answer for them. 

During the month of October, masks created by different local artists will be on exhibit at the Urban Arts Gallery, just in time for Halloween.

Located in The Gateway near downtown Salt Lake City, the gallery has been showing the works of local artists since 2013. Its mission is “to foster the arts in all forms in order to create an aware, empowered and connected community,” said gallery Manager Scott Tuckfield, noting that the gallery is under the non-profit umbrella of the Utah Arts Alliance.

Westside resident and West View newspaper staff writer Sheena Wolfe will be one of 15 featured artists in the “Spirit in Disguise” exhibit, showcasing masks in all forms. Wolfe is an award-winning artist and has been making kiln-formed glass masks for more than 20 years. She makes her own molds using actual people’s faces and fires in cycles that create three-dimensional layers. She is the only glass artist in the show.

 “Working with glass has always been therapeutic for me and fused glass is especially inspiring because the finished product stays a surprise until the kiln is cool enough to open –sometimes this can be two or three days,” Wolfe said. “It is my hope that each person who sees my creations feels that added sparkle that only glass can create. Each mask I design is uniquely different and has a distinct personality.”

Other artists in the October show are Anthony Siciliano, Chris Madsen, Desarae Lee, Essie Shaw, Frank McEntire, Garnett Wyatt, Grant Fuhst, Ivan Ramos, Jenna Rogan, Kelsie Mower, Roxanna Barco, Vincent Mattina, Vivian Arthus and Zane Anderson.

A public reception for these artists will be held during the Friday SLC Gallery Stroll on Oct. 15 from 6-9 p.m. The gallery stroll takes place on the third Friday of each month (except December when it’s on the first Friday of the month). Participating art galleries all over the city open their doors after hours to welcome art enthusiasts as they travel from gallery to gallery viewing visual art and meeting artists. This free event has been happening in Salt Lake City since 1983. Due to COVID-19, masks and social distancing is required at this time. Check the website at www.gallerystroll.org, or call (801)870-0956 to find out more information about participating galleries, which vary from month to month.

Published in Fall 2021

Your vote matters.

Salt Lake City’s Westside historically has a very low voter turnout. That is especially true for municipal elections, even though these local elections have a more direct impact on our lives. For example, our city council makes decisions about our police and fire departments, our streets and parks, our public utilities – virtually every aspect of our communities.

Normally, city council members are up for election every four years. However, this year, voters in City Council District 2 (Glendale, Poplar Grove, and Fairpark) will vote on a special city council race due to the resignation last April of former Council Member Andrew Johnston, who is now working in the Salt Lake City Mayor’s office as the Director of Homelessness Policy and Outreach. Whoever is elected in District 2 will only serve a two-year term.

Voters in Rose Park, Westpointe, and Jordan Meadows will elect a new District 1 City Council member this November, since former Council Member James Rogers resigned in early October. The City Council will appoint a replacement for Rogers in November, after the election. The appointee will fill the remainder of Roger’s term through December, after which the winner of the election will take over. It is likely that the city council will appoint the candidate who was elected.

The West View posed the following questions to each of the city council candidates to help inform voters:

  • What qualifies you to represent your council district?
  • Identify two crucial issues facing your district. As a city council member, what specific actions will you take to address those issues?
  • What is your background, and what motivated you to run?
  • Identify an example where you had to make a choice between doing what was right and was popular/politically expedient.
  • How will you know the needs of your constituents?

For more election info, including how to register to vote, visit the Salt Lake County Clerk’s website.

 

Published in Fall 2021

What qualifies you to represent your district?

I’m a Polynesian-American resident of Poplar Grove. Being a resident here for the past decade, I understand the need for representation of our diverse population. I come with a fresh perspective and am excited for the good we can do together.

Identify two key issues that you are concerned about. As a city council member, what specific actions will you take to address those issues?

A - We need to create better ways to engage our community members. The Westside has been neglected for so long that many of its residents feel that civic engagement is futile. Also, the problems of the day-to-day grind make it difficult for our citizens to feel like their participation is worthwhile. When government officials see that apathy, they continue that neglect as status quo. That’s a tough cycle to break, but we can do it. The more voices that are represented, the better the outcomes will be in our city’s development. I think fostering a better sense of ownership will also increase involvement, and that will come as we continue to improve our Westside and make it a place we are even more proud to call home. 

B - I think economic development is another key issue for our district. A lot of focus is put on Covid-19 recovery, but I think our neighborhoods need to do more than just recover to pre-Covid-19 status. We need real economic growth that will translate to everything else improving in our community. The more we can keep our wealth in our district, or even better to attract outside wealth, will improve the quality of life by helping to provide the funding for projects and programs needed to facilitate that. If we can generate that kind of economic power, by encouraging more businesses to start or move to our area, we will also see improvements in other areas as well. 

What is your background, and what motivated you to run?

Originally from inner-city Los Angeles, I moved to Utah to complete my doctoral studies in music at the University of Utah and I have been a resident of the community since 2012. When you live somewhere, it’s up to you to make it the best it can be. I decided to run to contribute to that ideal. I believe Salt Lake is a great place to live, but it can be better. All I can promise is a sharp mind and high integrity, someone who will stand firm for what is best for our neighborhood. 

Identify an example where you had to make a choice between doing what was right and what was popular/politically expedient.

The beauty of not being a career-oriented politician is not needing to worry about doing what’s politically expedient. I wish I could say I had some major defining moment when my integrity was put to the test, but ultimately my entire life is an example of the type of decision maker I will be. It’s in the little things: paying my share of taxes, driving the speed limit, keeping my commitments to my family, my church, and my community. Choosing to do what you consider to be right, despite the outcomes, is a cumulative quality that comes with the buildup of all those small decisions. I don’t have any aspirations that are worth sacrificing my integrity.   

If you are elected, how will you engage with your constituents to know their needs/concerns?

If elected I will do my best to provide many ways for my constituents to be in contact with me. Whether formally or informally, I want to provide as much facetime as possible with those in my district. I think one of my best traits is my ability to communicate, where it is just as important to understand as it is to be understood. I will do my best to understand those who I represent (even if I can’t promise to make them all happy all the time). I strongly believe that our neighborhood needs a bigger buy-in from more of its members, and I think more events that encourage us to come together will be a key element to achieving that goal. With that said, I don’t think it’s only up to the elected leadership to do all the work, it’s a team effort with everyone in our community doing what they can. I do hope that if you are reading this, remember that whoever gets elected to this city council position will not be able to do it alone. 

What qualifies you to represent your district?

In a word, experience. I grew up here. I went to school here.

I understand the people who live here. I've spent tons of time in city council work sessions learning how council members think and work and I've been a tireless advocate for Westside issues as a community council member and chair of a business chamber.

Identify two key issues that you are concerned about. As a city council member, what specific actions will you take to address those issues?

Residents tell me public safety and homelessness top the list of challenges to the city. To me, public safety includes crime, fire and auto/pedestrian safety. We have an officer shortage in Salt Lake City and a problem with both jail space and prosecutions. The first step is to rebuild our police force. Salt Lake City should lead when it comes to salaries and that should help with recruiting experienced officers from other departments. We should expand the Ambassador program to get more uniforms on the streets where we need them the most. We should hire private security to protect public property like parks and other real estate assets. The latter two steps will reduce calls to police, reduce fires and send a message to criminals that Salt Lake is no longer a good place to do business. Once this is in place, then we can address the criminal element in public camps better while we enforce existing laws and provide resources to the most shelter-resistant homeless people. 

We need to work on reducing systemic barriers to the homeless like identification requirements and requiring shelter stays to access other types of housing aid. I would also revisit zoning for single room occupancy throughout the city. SROs are a viable and effective means of providing housing for the most vulnerable, but they need to have onsite case management. Salt Lake also needs to investigate raising the city's minimum wage because of the high cost of living. State law doesn't currently limit municipalities from doing this. We can't lower the cost of housing significantly, nor can we lower the cost of living. Creating a higher minimum wage in SLC, supporting entrepreneurism and recruiting businesses with higher average wages are all steps to make housing more attainable to residents.

What is your background, and what motivated you to run?

My family moved to Salt Lake from Jamaica when I was six. I grew up on the Westside. Six years ago, I moved back. I saw potential. I saw the eyes on the Westside and wanted to be part of it. I started showing up. I started learning. I followed through. I started with the Fairpark Community Council, becoming a board member and now serving as chair. I did that with the River District Chamber (now River District Business Alliance) serving as its chair for three years. All of that has led me here, seeking to represent the neighborhood I grew up in.

Identify an example where you had to make a choice between doing what was right and what was popular/politically expedient.

As Chair of the River District Chamber, reducing crime and creating business opportunities was one of our goals. I was tasked with raising the profile of the chamber and fulfilling the North Temple goal. When crime increased, I reached out to the media to get greater police presence from the city. Some members of the chamber board thought calling attention to the problem would be bad for business. I submit unwalkable sidewalks, rampant theft, and murders outside of businesses are bad for business. I didn't back down on telling that story as often as I could. The result was getting a temporary police station established and the Gateway Inn sold to a more reasonable owner who has a better vision for the property.

If you are elected, how will you engage with your constituents to know their needs/concerns?

I like social media as a way to connect with residents. I would continue to make brief recaps of city council meetings. Attending community council meetings is another way to stay connected. My phone is public and I talk to a lot of people that way as well. As a marketer, I believe the best way to communicate is the platform the resident wants to use and feels most comfortable. I currently use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Email, Telephone, in person, Zoom and carrier pigeon.

What qualifies you to represent your district?

I have lived here since 2013 and run a music-based nonprofit that gives our community’s kids a safe place to be after school. As our district’s Historic Landmarks Representative since 2017, I effectively use my master’s in political science and refined experience advocating for the people and places I love.

Identify two key issues that you are concerned about. As a city council member, what specific actions will you take to address those issues?

Homelessness - I propose we implement a three-year crisis management plan that focuses on bringing order to the current situation, offering hope to those who are homeless and security to the residents of our communities. We need to conduct a clear needs assessment, gathering data on the actual state of the crisis, and generate a comprehensive plan for addressing it. As part of the plan, the city needs to outline the issues that are within the city’s purview and capacity to address and clearly outline the work the county and state will need to supplement. During this crisis management stage, the infrastructure must be developed to address the various constituencies within our homeless community. Once the crisis is stabilized and infrastructure is built, the following timeframe needs to be marked by a sustainable action plan and specific MOU’s between the county, state, and city to ensure future management of the issue.

Economic Development - We are home to the most innovative (and often most delicious) entrepreneurs in the city. The tamales from the Smith’s parking lot alone deserve their own storefront. I want to work for an economic development strategy that creates abundant opportunity for local business owners to grow their ideas to prosperity. Equitable opportunities should be the norm for our district. As a Westside council member, I will ensure that the RDA and Economic Development department invests in us, rather than trying to fix us or save us, as can be the default. I am excited at the idea that the growth of our neighborhood could mean walkable eateries and coffee shops and boutiques. I am determined to ensure that our residents can be part of the growth and see a sustainable future for themselves here!

What is your background, and what motivated you to run?

I am from New York, but grew up as an Army brat in Europe. Shortly after moving here in 2013, I realized I wanted to put down roots in SLC. I’ve been devoting myself to community building since then. I decided to run after the bridge fire earlier this year. When the bridge burned and creosote fell from the sky and neighbors wondered why their asthma was acting up, there was a notable void in communication from the city. I am running for this position to make sure our voice is not just heard, but listened to and responded to.

Identify an example where you had to make a choice between doing what was right and what was popular/politically expedient.

As the executive director of a small nonprofit, messaging is so important. As our program grew, there was the pressure to “get to the point” and rely on stereotypes as the basis for asking for money. This accepted practice paints the Westside families we serve as coming from poverty or being disadvantaged. Other nonprofits who work in Westside schools talk about our kids as being “disadvantaged” or “underserved.” It is a popular and accepted practice, but I always knew it was not right.

Early on, I recognized my privilege to do the work I do, serving the most amazing young people and their families on the Westside through afterschool music programs. I chose not to define them by deficits - rather by the promise they hold. I talk about how we remove the barriers to their success. The result is that my grant applications require more explanation and I need to sometimes clarify with funders, but the kids I work with and their families and our community are never painted as charity cases. Instead, I get to let everyone know our greatness, leading from our promise and inviting investment to our area.

If you are elected, how will you engage with your constituents to know their needs/concerns?

Responsiveness to my neighbors is the single most important promise I make to them. I give my personal cell phone number to everyone I meet - it’s on all my literature, my website, and my social media. Beyond that, I have created wonderful relationships with the community councils. Though imperfect, the community council system has served us faithfully and will factor heavily into remaining responsive to the community. I will have regular community meeting opportunities and email / postcard distributions to keep constituents informed as well.

Beyond anything formal, I am still going to be a mom to three kids who attend elementary school here. I will still be running my nonprofit organization that will continue to serve your students. I will still be running into Smith’s with no makeup on and harried because I have no milk for my kids’ cereal. I am running because I am us; and that will not change just because I add a new job title to my résumé. I will always make myself available to my neighbors.

What qualifies you to represent your district?

1. As the former chair of the Rose Park Community Council, I have a track record of delivering results that have helped to improve the quality of life in our neighborhoods. As a former transportation planner for Salt Lake City, I know why a keen eye on our budget matters. 

Identify two key issues that you are concerned about. As a city council member, what specific actions will you take to address those issues?

Air quality- I've got three main strategies to improve our air quality. First, reducing our emissions by investing in more multimodal options like transit, biking, and walking. Second, we need to aggressively pursue carbon sequestration by using city-owned land and public right of ways to plant more trees and vegetation. Carbon sequestration is pivotal in pulling our carbon legacy out of our atmosphere and improving our climate. Third, we must continue to invest in reliable particulate data as air quality dynamics change. Western wildfires, summer ozone, and a shrinking Great Salt Lake are all adding different particulates to our air shed and we must make sure our communities have access to accurate information.

Growth- Our most recent census data showed the incredible growth of our state - and the youngest population in the country. While this is an incredible opportunity for expanding our tax base, we must keep our eye on how this growth impacts our local communities, natural resources, and quality of life. It is critical that any updated zoning or land-use policy is matched with transportation policy and investments that aim to reduce emissions, make our public right of ways safer, and build long term resiliency and sustainability. As we grow, our public safety needs to evolve and meet the values and principles of our communities. I’ll ensure our public safety departments are equipped to meet the evolving needs of today and the future.

What is your background, and what motivated you to run?

As a former non-profit professional and city planner, and the current deputy director of an interlocal government agency, my background has prepared me to make decisions that are both inclusive and decisive. My time as chair of Rose Park Community Council has been the most rewarding and is what motivated me to run. Working shoulder to shoulder with my neighbors on community-initiated and -led projects is what inspires me to be our district's representative.

Identify an example where you had to make a choice between doing what was right and what was popular/politically expedient.

600 North has long been a dangerous corridor for our residents. In fact, there have been several deaths from auto-pedestrian collisions. For many years, our neighbors asked the city for safety improvements with no action. It was time for our community to organize and act. We applied for funding through the city’s CIP process and were denied funding for the project. We could have easily folded up and accepted that decision. The time was ripe to act. I encouraged our community to organize, not accept the initial decision, and continue to pursue funding for the project. We created a robust, public awareness and action campaign called “Slow Down 6th North Campaign” to fund the project we were initially denied. We developed a website outlining our project, how to engage with city council members, and a petition for residents to sign in support of the project. We gathered over 600 signatures, dozens of emails sent to city council members, and we showed up to comment at a city council meeting. That project was funded and has been an example of how we can organize as a community to ensure city investments in our Westside communities. 

If you are elected, how will you engage with your constituents to know their needs/concerns? 

During my time as Rose Park Community Council chair, it was important to me to try and reach more neighbors who couldn’t make a monthly meeting on a Wednesday night. So, we led several different activities to engage with more neighbors. This includes neighborhood clean-ups, beautification projects, workshops, surveys, speed networking etc. I've got a track record of doing outside-the-box engagement to increase community participation. As a councilmember I’m committed to doing the same. I’ll certainly use traditional methods of engagement through emails, phone calls, texts, and traditional meetings. I’ll also continue to knock on doors throughout the year as I find that one-on-one connection method the most meaningful. Diverse constituent feedback and differing perspectives makes for a better decision-making process.

What qualifies you to represent your district?

Aside from my 50 years living on the Westside, what makes me most qualified is my experience fighting for and empowering our neighborhoods, and my relationships within our community. That history matters and it’s why I’ve earned the support of our Westside elected officials and community leaders. 

Identify two key issues that you are concerned about. As a city council member, what specific actions will you take to address those issues?

Among the many issues facing the Westside and our city, we need a broader vision that understands how our social and economic challenges are connected so we can truly address their causes and find real solutions. Community empowerment and equity should drive our policies on affordable housing, homelessness, development, and public safety. 

On homelessness, we must approach the issue from a human level, redefine how we measure capacity, and innovate better solutions because everyone knows what we have now is not working. We must make our resource centers more robust, increase the number of beds available for individuals and families, improve coordination among service providers, and develop further outreach and wrap-around services to deal with those individuals who refuse to enter shelters due to trauma, mental health, or addiction. 

Our housing policies must provide options across all incomes. We cannot concentrate all the city’s low-income housing on the Westside. Our city must develop and incentivize inclusionary housing projects to offer affordable, mixed-income housing, giving people their neighborhood of choice and developing a viable consumer base to foster, attract and support businesses on the Westside. Through home ownership and economic growth, we can empower our community and make a more equitable city.

As our city grows, we must also focus on public safety and sustainability. As our city grows larger, our transportation and infrastructure priorities serve as real measures of equity. Our Westside neighborhoods deserve equitable infrastructure, which includes our roads, bridges, power grid, Internet access, sewer system, sidewalks, curbs and gutters. Our Westside neighborhoods deserve a transportation system that is affordable, accessible and convenient. Our Westside neighborhoods deserve safe streets for everyone who uses our roads and sidewalks.

These key issues of community empowerment and equity are where I’ll focus my efforts as your next council member.

What is your background, and what motivated you to run?

I’ve lived on the Westside my whole life. My childhood included evictions and homelessness, but I learned the value of community through YouthWorks and have been fighting for the Westside ever since. I’ve heard many longtime Westsiders reflect on what we’ve lost, and many newer Westsiders want to see those same things return. We need a council member with a history rooted in the Westside, who has a real record getting things done, and who can offer an inspiring vision for our Westside. With support from our community leaders, I decided to run because Westside neighborhoods and families deserve more. 

Identify an example where you had to make a choice between doing what was right and what was popular/politically expedient.

In Utah, I often find myself advancing social causes that are unpopular in this state. Launching the Poor People’s Campaign to fight against poverty, Marching for Women’s Rights, co-founding Racially Just Utah to fight against the school-to-prison pipeline, protesting for Marriage Equality – most of my community-based advocacy work has been against the grain here in Utah. Much of it is before movements have gained their momentum, like my hosting radio conversations on sexual assault or lifting trans voices on KRCL. These examples show a strong moral compass, and my record shows I will always do the right thing for our Westside neighborhoods and community. 

If you are elected, how will you engage with your constituents to know their needs/concerns?

Much of my advocacy and community work has been centered on the Westside and has always been intentionally based within our community. The nature of this work is driven by the needs and concerns of our Westside community. The development of the Glendale Library is an instructive example of how to envision and develop a project on the Westside: you reach out to people where they are and engage them in meaningful conversations. I was part of those conversations and know that community needs and concerns informed the building we now enjoy. 

The process of community engagement involves understanding our community and having relationships rooted in our Westside neighborhoods. Communication has to be more than the occasional email or notice on your water bill. We need a council member that reaches out to neighbors and cares about what they say. If elected, I will press the city for better outreach and engagement systems in our city, I will always reach out to neighbors directly, so I stay true to our community, and ensure that Westside vacancies on city boards and commissions are filled. Community engagement will be a major focus for me because I believe representation matters and community engagement is how we all have a seat at the table. 

What qualifies you to represent your district?

I’ve spent 18 years working to improve my community. My approach to almost every issue is to find realistic short term steps toward achieving a long term goal. What work can we begin today to more efficiently and effectively improve our lives and our community a little bit each day?

Identify two key issues that you are concerned about. As a city council member, what specific actions will you take to address those issues? [maximum of 150 words each or 300 words total]

Issue 1: Public Safety

Our community has many concerns regarding public safety. As an immediate step, after less than 6 weeks in office and with the help of my colleagues on the City Council, we approved a wage increase in the annual budget that successfully ensured our public safety employees are the best paid anywhere in the state. We also allocated funding to achieve my goal of establishing a new alternate response model that will be presented soon. This model could consider being staffed with social workers and EMT’s to be able to better address noncriminal issues like homelessness and mental health concerns. This can relieve strain on our first responders to quickly improve response times across our city. \

Issue 2 Public Lands and Greenspace

My approach has continued in my efforts to maintain, increase, and improve our public greenspaces. As the Chair of the PNUT Board, I worked alongside many others to create the new Three Creeks Confluence Park. I also fought hard with Poplar Grove Community Council to refurbish the Fisher Mansion back to glory, starting with the renovation of the Carriage House that will commence next year, and continuing with funding proposed in a new bond to finally make the main building safe and functional. I am now working toward creating a public/private partnership between SLC, nonprofits, and businesses to use available resources to keep our Jordan River Parkway Trail cleaner and safer for all our residents, without costing any additional money. 

What is your background, and what motivated you to run?

Just as I answered the call to serve in the Air Force during Operation Desert Storm, I was one of 17 people from our community that answered the call to apply to fill this seat when it was vacated in April. After a rigorous selection process, I was appointed by a unanimous vote based on my 18 year track record of consistent work to improve this community. I am here to ask you to vote for me, Dennis Faris for SLC District 2 City Council, to continue that work in the years to come. 

Identify an example where you had to make a choice between doing what was right and what was popular/politically expedient.

The difference between doing what is right and what is popular with the community is a balancing act that all representatives must do from time to time. The two main considerations I take into any decision I have to make as the representative of District 2 are resident feedback and expert advice. While those two may not always align, I commit to making myself accessible to every one of my constituents so I can explain the decisions I make as your Councilmember.

If you are elected, how will you engage with your constituents to know their needs/concerns?

As I have always done, my phone number (801-699-1381) and email () are very publicly available to anyone who needs to connect with me.

Please feel free to reach out at any time to help me better understand what you are experiencing. As both the former chair and vice-chair of the Poplar Grove Community Council and regular attendant of the Glendale and Fairpark Community Council meetings, I will continue to be consistently present and look forward to hearing concerns, questions and recommendations from my friends, neighbors, and constituents.

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